Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Childhood Soy Diet Linked To Lower Risk Of Breast Cancer In Asian Americans

Researchers studying American women of Asian descent found that soy intake from childhood through to adulthood was linked to a decreased risk of breast cancer, with the strongest and most consistent association being for childhood soy intake. The study was the work of senior researcher Dr Regina...
March 25th, 2009 | News | Read More

Rep. Wasserman Schultz Proposes National Breast Cancer Educational Campaign For Younger Women

Two days after publicly announcing that she is a breast cancer survivor, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) introduced legislation on Monday that would direct HHS to develop a national breast cancer educational campaign aimed at women younger than age 40 and their doctors, the Washington Post reports. Please...
March 25th, 2009 | News | Read More

Pioneering Hospital Opens In New Orleans

The American Cancer Society estimated 182,460 new cases of breast cancer would be diagnosed in 2008, equaling one diagnosis every 3 minutes. Today there are nearly 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. After 18 months of keen anticipation, Frank J. DellaCroce, MD, FACS and Scott K....
March 25th, 2009 | News | Read More

Eating Soy Early In Life May Reduce Breast Cancer Among Asian Women

Asian-American women who ate higher amounts of soy during childhood had a 58 percent reduced risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. “Historically, breast cancer incidence...
March 24th, 2009 | News | Read More

Breast Cancer Deaths May Rise As Fewer Women Opt For Routine Screening, USA

American women may be setting themselves up for a future increase in breast cancer mortality as fewer premenopausal women follow guidelines favoring routine annual screening mammography, according to a study on mammography use from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mammographers worry...
March 24th, 2009 | News | Read More

Physically Fit Women Less Likely To Die From Breast Cancer

A new study of more than 14,000 women links physical fitness and breast cancer mortality, revealing an inverse association between aerobic fitness and likelihood of death from the disease. The results are published in the April issue of Please read the complete article and let us know what you think...
March 24th, 2009 | News | Read More

New Project Set To Transform Patients’ Experience Of Care And Deliver Better Breast Care , Milton Keynes Hospital, England

The Breast Care Unit at Milton Keynes Hospital NHS Foundation Trust is running a new project, which is set to engage patients and staff to improve services. Milton Keynes Hospital is the first hospital in the country to use Experienced Based Design (EBD) to improve breast care. EBD is a new way of bringing...
March 24th, 2009 | News | Read More

Super Micro-Surgery Offers New Hope For Breast Cancer Patients With Lymphedema

Breast cancer patients with lymphedema in their upper arm experienced reduced fluid in the swollen arm by up to 39 percent after undergoing a super-microsurgical technique known as lymphaticovenular bypass, report researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Please read the complete...
March 24th, 2009 | News | Read More

Drug Como Tolerated In Lung And Breast Cancer Patients Shows Positive Response For Hodgkin’s Disease In Young Adults

New research published in the latest print edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology (Vol. 27, No. 9) shows a treatment combination used in breast and lung cancers to be effective against Hodgkin’s disease in pre-teens and young adults. Richard Drachtman, MD, the interim chief and medical director...
March 23rd, 2009 | News | Read More

Racial Disparities In Cancer Mortality Rates Between Blacks And Whites Quantified By Study

African Americans have a shorter life expectancy than whites, and cancer plays a major role in this disparity. African Americans are more prone to get cancer; they tend to present at a later, deadlier stage; and they have poorer survival rates after diagnosis. But to what extent are each of these...
March 23rd, 2009 | News | Read More