Review: Laughter Yoga

Cancer Support, Cancer Websites — By on December 28, 2008 at 3:12 pm

Laughter Yoga is a revolutionary idea – simple and profound. Laughter Yoga combines unconditional laughter with yogic breathing.

According to University of Michigan Health System fitness experts, laughter yoga, part of a growing trend in parts of the United States, India and other countries, can really make a difference in your overall health.

Extreme physical, mental and emotional stress weakens our immune system. A weak immune system is a major causative factor in the development of cancer.

Cancer is the second most common killer after heart disease today. The number of people suffering from cancer is rising constantly. The most common cause of cancer is stress.

Scientific studies have proved that hearty laughter has a powerful and immediate strengthening effect on our immune system. Laughter quickly increases immunoglobulin levels that help fight infection and increases the number of Natural Killer Cells (NK cells) in the blood.

Natural killer cells play a key role in cancer prevention. Dr Berk took blood samples from subjects watching humorous videos and found that natural killer cells increased significantly with laughter. The NK cells in blood samples from laughing subjects quickly killed cancer cells he introduced into the samples.

Cancer is considered a killer disease. When someone is struck with cancer it leads to intense stress and fear. How can laughter yoga help? The healing effects of laughter in cancer patients as practiced in Laughter Yoga as a physical intervention leads to real physiological and biochemical changes in our body that have a profound effect on the development of cancer.

Laughter Yoga can reduce stress, depression and anger and helps to fight illnesses like diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis and cancer.

Visit: Laughter Yoga and share your comments and opinions below with the CancerDirectory.com community.

Tags: , ,

    1 Comment

  • Steve Wilson says:

    The physiology of laughing leads me to believe that we might not laugh just because we are happy but we probably will be happier if we laugh more. Certainly, we can head off the ill-effects of stress. But, to make laughter and humor a natural part of the way we live, on a daily basis, we should go beyond the physical act of laughing and also change (heal) the attitudes we carry that increase our stress and create barriers to laughter. I call this Good-Hearted Living. Information about the simple six-step program is at http://www.worldlaughtertour.com. Those interested in the therapeutic benefits of humor and laughter should also go to http://www.aath.org (Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor).

Leave a Reply

Trackbacks

Leave a Trackback