Review: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Cancer Websites, Hospitals — By on July 16, 2008 at 8:19 am

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Possible.  A word generally associated with conquering cancer? Dana-Farber believes it is. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, associated with Harvard Medical School, is one of the world’s premier cancer centers. Founded in 1947, it is renowned for scientific discoveries leading to major advances in treating cancer.  Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s ultimate goal is the eradication of cancer, AIDS, and related diseases and the fear that they engender.

We at Cancer Directory, have found some of the most fascinating information on scientific advances for both patients and health care practitioners on this site.  There is a wealth of information about cancer treatment information by disease.  Most of the information in this section is available in two formats: one written for patients, another written for medical professionals. The patient version uses common language, while the version for medical professionals may contain unfamiliar medical language and details.

You will also find articles about the latest in research advances including how metabolism affects the body in the development of cancer, drug development at Dana-Farber, links to journals  and much more. We also recommend that you click on:  http://www.dana-farber.org/can/what/default.html  to learn about; what cancer is?

There is an interesting section in the area of Epigenetics.  Epigenetics, the system for switching genes on and off without changing their basic sequence, is earning increased attention among cancer researchers.

Please visit: http://www.dana-farber.org/  for one of the most reputable and specialized sources in the advancement of treating cancer.

 

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    2 Comments

  • Keena Bloxom says:

    As an ICU nurse, I do wonder if the $$ amounts here are really reflective of anything except the fact that often, lung cancer goes undetected until the patient drops in his tracks. It doesn’t show up on Xray until it is huge; we sometimes keep people on ventilators for weeks with daily X-rays showing nothing, then take them to CT once they are more stable and….uh oh.

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